Workstation Setup 2011

A new workstation means it’s time to install lots of stuff, and we’re still a long way from DropSteam.  Here’s my log from fresh Windows 7 install in a new VM image to a functional development environment:

First, I hit Ninite and install:

  • All Browsers (I use Chrome as default)
  • Adobe Air
  • Adobe flash
  • VLC Player
  • IrfanView
  • Inkscape
  • Paint.NET
  • Foxit Reader
  • PDFCreator
  • CutePDF (yes, you need both PDF printers, as it’s fairly common for one of them to have a problem with a particular job)
  • CCleaner (tweak settings before running so you don’t nuke more than you want to, like browser history)
  • 7-Zip
  • Notepad++
  • WinSCP
  • JDK

Then I grab the ZIP of all of the Putty programs.  I put installer-less programs like this in C:\bin

Cloudberry Freeware for Amazon S3 buckets.

Download JavaDoc and install in JDK folder.

Download Eclipse (3.4, not impressed with 4.X so far) and then:

  • Set text font to 8pt Lucida Console
  • Most companies and many open source projects are still using SVN so I install the Subclipse plugin for Eclipse.
  • I’m not a huge fan of m2eclipse but I find that doing eclipse:eclipse from the command line costs you too much integration, so I use it.
  • Turn on all compiler warnings except:
    • Non-Externalized Strings – Enable as-needed
    • serialVersionUID – Not useful for most projects
    • Method can potentially be static – False positives on unit tests
  • Turn on line numbers
  • Install CheckStyle.
  • Install FindBugs.

Maven 3 seems a little rough around the edges so I still use Maven 2.X

Install Cygwin and add git, svn, curl, and ssh packages.

Install MySQL Community Edition.  During the installer I:

  • Change the charset to utf8
  • Fix the windows service name to something like MYSQL5
  • Add to windows path
  • Add a password

JRebel.  You’re using this, right?  If not, slap yourself and then go get it.  Pay for the license out of your own pocket if you need to.

Lombok.  I have finally used this on a real project and can say it’s ready for prime-time.  It does not work with IntelliJ IDEA but I haven’t really seen any reasons to use IntelliJ that outweigh the benefits of Lombok.

Photoshop Elements because while IrfanView is great for viewing and Paint.NET is great for simple edits, you will at some point need a more powerful editor.  Also most designers work in Photoshop so this let’s you open those files directly.

Photoshop Elements+ is basically a $12 unlock of some of Elements’ crippled features.  For me it’s worth it for tracking alone.

LastPass is useful even if you don’t store anything sensitive in it, it’s great for testing webapps with multiple users.

I use Git for my own work so we’ll need that. Don’t forget to set your name!

I also make some Windows tweaks:

  • Set desktop background to black.
  • Check “Show hidden files, folder and drives”.
  • Uncheck “Hide extensions for known file types”.
  • Set %JAVA_HOME to JDK directory.
  • Add Maven’s bin directory to %PATH
  • Add C:\bin to %PATH

I will obviously add more over time, but this is the stuff I know I will need.  What’s great is that almost all of it is free, and it can all be downloaded (except the original Windows install), so no disks required like the old days

You might think this is an incomplete list, where is my email client, my MS/Open office, my music player?  I don’t use those unless I have to.  Keep in mind that this is a VM so some of this software is installed on the Host OS, while the rest of it I prefer to use web-based solutions (Meebo, Google docs, webmail) so there’s no issues of having to keep updating settings.

To switch or not to switch, Part 1

This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series To switch or not to switch

I was listening to a talk the other day and the speaker derisively mentioned “those people who are happy writing Java for the rest of their lives”, and I thought “Am I one of those?” and then I thought “is that a bad thing?”. As part of my “question everything” journey, I decided that it was time, after 10+ years, to have Java report for inspection and force it to defend its title.

I should make it clear, that I am not a language geek, or collector. I generally disagree with “use the right language for the right problem”, I prefer “use the right language for most of your problems”. So far, Java has been that for me. Some things I do in Java are more easily done in other languages, but not so much so that it overtakes the headaches of heterogeneous codebases. If something is really difficult, or impossible in your main language, bring something else in, but keep it simple. I also think it’s fine to have more than one main language, a client of mine is currently transitioning off C#, keeping Java, and adding Python. What they don’t have is random parts of their infrastructure done in erlang or perl or tcl because that’s what someone wanted to use that day.

I could make this task easier and just look at the “marketable” skills out there, which is a small subset. While I think it’s unlikely that there is some forgetten language just waiting for its moment, it’s certainly possible I could find a neat one that’s fun to play with. Languages like Ruby and Python spent years before people could find jobs doing them. So I’m going to look at literally every single language I can find, and put them through a series of tests. If you find a language I haven’t mentioned, let me know and it will be given the same chance as the rest.

Round 1:

The point of this round is to identify languages that have any potential for being useful to me.

Qualifying Criteria

Rule 1. It must be “active”.
This is admitedly a subjective term, but we’ll see how it goes. Simula is clearly not active, while Processing clearly is, with a release only weeks ago.
Rule 2. It must compile and run on modern consumer hardware and operating systems.
This means, at minimum, it works on at least one modern flavor of Linux, because I will want this to run on a server somewhere, and I don’t want a Windows or OS X server, or worse, something obscure. For bonus points, it will also work on Windows 7 and/or OS X.

So, that’s it for now. There are no requirements for web frameworks or lambdas or preference for static versus dynamic typing, I think those elements will play out in later rounds.

  • Ada
  • Agena
  • ALGOL 68
  • ATS
  • BASIC
  • BETA
  • Boo
  • C
  • C#
  • C++
  • Clean
  • Clojure
  • COBOL
  • Cobra
  • Common Lisp
  • D
  • Diesel
  • Dylan
  • E
  • Eiffel
  • Erlang
  • F#
  • Factor
  • Falcon
  • Fantom
  • FORTH
  • Fortran
  • GameMonkey Script
  • Go
  • Groovy
  • Haskell
  • Icon
  • Io
  • Ioke
  • Java
  • JavaScript
  • Logo
  • Lua
  • Maple
  • MiniD
  • Mirah
  • Miranda
  • Modula-3
  • MUMPS
  • Nu
  • Objective Caml
  • Objective-C
  • Pascal
  • Perl
  • PHP
  • Pike
  • Processing
  • Pure
  • Python
  • Reia
  • Ruby
  • Sather
  • Scala
  • Scheme
  • Scratch
  • Self
  • SPARK
  • SQL
  • Squeak
  • Squirrel
  • Tcl
  • Tea
  • Timber
  • Unicon
  • Vala
  • Visual Basic .NET

This list is actually a LOT longer than I expected, and yes, there actually is a modern version of ALGOL 68. Stay tuned for part 2.

Wish List: Session Moratorium

DetourA feature that the major open-source/free servlet containers (Tomcat, Jetty, Resin) lack, AFAIK, is the ability to tell the container to stop issuing new sessions, and more importantly, make this flag known to the HTTP server connector. One or more of Websphere, Weblogic, and ATG Dynamo (I forget which) has this ability, and it’s extremely useful for higher-volume websites.

How it works: Server Bank A is running, Server Bank B is dormant. When you have a new release, you push it to B. Once B is up and running (this can take a while with some advanced applications), you tell A to stop issuing new sessions, and the load balancers send all new traffic to B. Once traffic has bled off of A entirely, A becomes dormant, and is ready for the next release.

Why it’s valuable: You can do a release without interrupting any sessions. This was particularly valuable on the project we used it on, because there was plenty of time to pre-compile pages, and the transactions were relatively high-value ones, so it was worth the price of the commercial license to ensure that none were lost or interrupted.

Considering all of the containers are relatively close performance-wise, and feature-wise, I think this would be a “killer feature” for any OSS container that had it.